: Sediment In Coolant Tank


FLORIT
05-09-2004, 05:58 AM
I'm spending a quiet Sunday morning with my GTO. This is almost better than "pillow talk."

I see a large amount of black sediment in my coolant tank. The sediment is floating in the coolant and clinging to the sides of the tank. The sediment is about the size and consistency of black pepper. I think it might be "paint flakes." Does anyone else see this sediment? Does anyone know what it is? I doubt it is harmful, but I would like to know if it is a "problem sign." Thanks.

Dbluegoat
05-09-2004, 06:03 AM
I'm spending a quiet Sunday morning with my GTO. This is almost better than "pillow talk."

I see a large amount of black sediment in my coolant tank. The sediment is floating in the coolant and clinging to the sides of the tank. The sediment is about the size and consistency of black pepper. I think it might be "paint flakes." Does anyone else see this sediment? Does anyone know what it is? I doubt it is harmful, but I would like to know if it is a "problem sign." Thanks.

I think I have this too, I was thinking mine was from the sealant tablets the dealer put in to fix my freezeplug leak. However it maybe something else.

tommycap30
05-09-2004, 04:02 PM
It could be residual casting sand from the molds.GM has had problems in the past where there was so much sand in the coolant passages that it was plugging heater cores.Unfortunately there's not much that can be done other than to have your dealer continually flush the system until they can get it all out

COSMO GUY
05-09-2004, 05:27 PM
No, my coolant tank clear and orange. But there were other members with freeze plug leaks??? :drink:

DANSLS1
05-09-2004, 07:22 PM
Well, there is the old 'used car salesman' trick of using black pepper to fill pinhole radiator leaks...
Dan

tommycap30
05-09-2004, 07:41 PM
Well, there is the old 'used car salesman' trick of using black pepper to fill pinhole radiator leaks...
Dan
We hardly ever do that anymore!!!LOL

UBDSLO1
05-09-2004, 07:50 PM
that bites guys, lets hope it's not sand circulating around in there.

DANSLS1
05-10-2004, 04:36 AM
We hardly ever do that anymore!!!LOL

Actually, in my 1978 mustang ii I had in high school, I developed a pinhole leak in mid-January. Being a senior in high school (ie broke) and having -10 high days, we did the pepper trick. It actually went a year and 1/2 and busted the whole seal on the top of the radiator.

Now, I haven't noticed any sediment in the antifreeze, but I did notice some 'gummy' dark grey sediment in the clutch hydraulic solution. It was on the top around the edges and wiped out pretty easy, but was kind of weird.
Dan

GTOJer
05-10-2004, 04:52 AM
I had the same thing in my clutch fluid. Felt like grease.

FLORIT
05-10-2004, 05:03 AM
I gather from everyone's input that I should have the dealer at least flush my cooling system. This bites. The car goes in the shop Tuesday (tomorrow) to have the hood repainted, and I'm leaving Friday for "Pontiacs In The Park." It may be next week before I could have that done. The car is running fine. Do you thing it is safe to take it on an 800 mile road trip?

mmciau
05-10-2004, 01:34 PM
If the sediment is just a "showing", it shouldn't effect cooling at all.

Mike

Speedy Gonzales
05-10-2004, 05:39 PM
I dont use Dexcool anymore since it leaves a grey colored sediment in the tank. For a coolant thats rated for 3 yrs, it turns "off" pretty quick.

After 1.5 yrs of driving, it came out looking dark red/orange color instead of the blood red you see when new.

I have since switched over to Pri Max. When I changed over, Ive noticed my coolant temp is consistently lower than with Dexcool and it is cleaner looking inside the coolant reservoir.

I change coolant once a yr.

TriShield
05-12-2004, 05:15 PM
GM (and other automakers) use "long life" coolant (aka DEXCOOL) in their new cars. Simply put, it's total garbage. It becomes thicker with use, and collects as hard buildup in the cooling system.

You're best off to completely flush out the cooling system, and use regular green engine coolant. I've done this on all of my late model GM vehicles with no problems.

Just be sure not to mix DEXCOOL and regular coolant.

speed_demon_freak
05-12-2004, 06:11 PM
I was thinking. (watch out) If the sediment is floating, it is going to the highest spot in the cooling system. The coolant tank. It might just be some by-products and it might only be in the coolant tank.

dms
05-14-2004, 12:20 AM
I do agree abut not letting dexcool last 5 years and GM says in my personal cars. 2 things, however, I do on my GM vehicles with dexcool: I check the radiator cap very frequently. Getting air exchange with a non perfect radiator cap does assist in the formations of contaminants. But I think one of the biggest issues iwith Dexcool is the interaction of normal chemicals in regular tap water. When doing a coolant flush on my vehicles, I will only use distilled water. It is really cheap, and I think it makes a difference.We have too many coolant contamination problems and leaking intake gaskets on multiple GM engines. Taking these precaustions can't hurt. If you do not bleive me, ask owners of some 1996 V6 engines with 10 pounds of red mud in their coolant system.

If you are going ot have the dealer flush out your coolant system, bring them the water, and insist on them using GM bottled Dexcool only. I do believe this is one of the reasons many of the foreign car manufacturers like Acura that sells you thier long lift coolant alreay premixed at about $14 a gallon!! Not all bottled Dexcool is equal. The GM stuff is by far the most expensive, but GM is paying for it, and it is the best stuff. Also make sure they put in the correct amount of Dexcool.
I do aggree with previous posts that a little sediment in the bottle would not cause or alarm me.
dms

mistermike
05-14-2004, 03:42 AM
I dont use Dexcool anymore since it leaves a grey colored sediment in the tank. For a coolant thats rated for 3 yrs, it turns "off" pretty quick.

After 1.5 yrs of driving, it came out looking dark red/orange color instead of the blood red you see when new.

I have since switched over to Pri Max. When I changed over, Ive noticed my coolant temp is consistently lower than with Dexcool and it is cleaner looking inside the coolant reservoir.

I change coolant once a yr.What's Pri Max?

LSX Performance
12-28-2005, 08:02 PM
I have the same isse you guys are talking about. I only noticed it after my cam swap. Im going to the dealer tomorrow to have the cooling system flushed.

Mean Goat
12-29-2005, 03:57 AM
I've heard that just about all vehicle manufacturers add a sealant to the coolant of new engines as a precautionary measure in case there are any leaks.

Anyone else know anything about this?

Cool_Hand_Luke
12-29-2005, 04:29 AM
I used to work for a company that supplies radiators and AC condensers to several manufacturers. We pressure tested them first then we added a couple stop leak pellets to the radiator just in case.

firegoat
12-29-2005, 04:36 AM
I've heard that just about all vehicle manufacturers add a sealant to the coolant of new engines as a precautionary measure in case there are any leaks. Anyone else know anything about this?

My 05 GTO has this same pepper looking sediment but it looks exactly like the material within GM cooling tabs. From my experience the GM cooling tabs do a good job of stopping small leaks and I have always used them on my GN whenever I have had to tear into the engine. I would have to say that what you are seeing is just extra material that has not found a home (leak) and is pretty much harmless. Thats my .02

bnvus
12-29-2005, 05:04 AM
Whoa...another old thread back from the grave. :judge:

Mean Goat
12-29-2005, 01:03 PM
I used to work for a company that supplies radiators and AC condensers to several manufacturers. We pressure tested them first then we added a couple stop leak pellets to the radiator just in case.

Probably a good idea.

GTPprix
12-29-2005, 01:05 PM
It's from coolant seal pellets.

LSX Performance
12-29-2005, 01:06 PM
I got the systm flushed today but they werent able to get all the stuff out. Im not worried about it though, at least theres brand new coolent in there now.

Enginerd
12-29-2005, 01:34 PM
You're best off to completely flush out the cooling system, and use regular green engine coolant. I've done this on all of my late model GM vehicles with no problems.

Bad advice. Very unwise for long term use in an aluminum engine.

Unless you like changing coolant frequently of course.

Might want to Google yourself the following term:

Hot transport deposition corrosion

mxrider503
11-28-2006, 12:02 PM
Hey guys my gto has a mud like substance on the dipstick (same look and feel) for the coolant.....any ideas as there was a pretty decent amount maybe a tablespoon or so. :yumyum:

pharmdgto
11-28-2006, 03:29 PM
Hey guys my gto has a mud like substance on the dipstick (same look and feel) for the coolant.....any ideas as there was a pretty decent amount maybe a tablespoon or so. :yumyum:

Has been numerous debates on this subject and we have come to the conclusion that since so many 05's have had it that it's normal or at least the norm for these cars. Supposedly either seal tablets or some sort of chemical chelation due to air getting into the system.

mxrider503
11-30-2006, 04:09 PM
so basically the dealer will flush it under warranty or no....nice stripes btw

pharmdgto
11-30-2006, 04:18 PM
so basically the dealer will flush it under warranty or no....nice stripes btw

More than likely if you take it into the dealer, they are going to tell you its normal and the result of seal tablets. If you raise enough stink about it they may flush it but there is a good chance if dexcool is used again, that it will come right back.

Your better off, if still worried about it, completely disconnecting all radiator hoses (after draining coolant) and flushing the block with copious amounts of water and then doing the same with the radiator and filling it back up with the green stuff. The problem is that if the dealer sees that in the car, they may void your warranty...

-db-
11-30-2006, 11:24 PM
Prestone makes and sells a cheap (Under $10) DIY flush kit sold at AutoZones, Murrays and any other national chain retail parts outlets that comes with a few different sized 3-way shunts and couplers that allows you to flush the entire coolant system in your own driveway. You simply tap the 3-way into one of the heater hoses, attach your garden hose and have at it (well, it's as simple as that for a guy like me- read and follow the instructions carefully for those not familiar with something like this).

Screw the hassle with the dealership or any other shop when you can fix the whole problem yourself in a half hour for ten bucks. Flush whatever factory crap is in there, and in my case, I drain all the flush water from the system and replace with a 70/30 distilled water/Dexcool mix. My car's stored for the winter so that's the mix I run during the nice months and then drain a gallon or so of the 70/30 and replace it with a gallon of Dexcool for winter storage (to attain close to a 50/50 mix to avoid freezing during storage) that's flushed, drained and replaced with the 70/30 mix the following Spring.

My car runs nice and cool with none of the "pepper flecks" or sludge problems associated with Dexcool during the summer and come winter time it's stored with an ideal 50/50 mix to prevent freezing/cracking, etc. Total time and investment annually? Let's call it 2 hours and maybe $25. Proper mixes, regular inspections and flushes done and right FTW.

yellowjacketfever
12-01-2006, 06:51 AM
mxrider. my last vehicle had the same stuff on the dipstick.it is not antifreeze. it is caused by a pin hole in the dipstick. mine had a oily milky crap real slimmy, is that what you are talking about. if you have antifreeze getting into the oil then you have a cracked head or a blowed head gascket.