The Ultimate CTS-v Brake Thread - Page 6 - LS1GTO.com Forums

Vendors


Go Back   LS1GTO.com Forums > GTO Tech > Suspension/Brakes

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old 12-11-2012, 07:50 PM   #151
HunterKiller89
Ecotec tech
 
HunterKiller89's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles area)
Posts: 2,126


Offline
Send a message via AIM to HunterKiller89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Havoc...View Post

So if we omit brake line pressure for a moment, all that's needed to determine a caliper's clamping force is to add up the piston surface area in one bank of the caliper because we already know the other side must produce an equal force.

that makes the sum of forces equal to the force from one side X2. All you're saying is that they're equal..a point I never disagreed with (since pressure is equal at all points of a hydraulic system). That doesn't mean you don't have to count it
__________________
Cars are nothing more than complicated chemistry problems that burn gasoline and turn it into a complicated physics problem.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-12-2012, 07:29 AM   #152
seawolf06
Premium Member
 
seawolf06's Avatar
 
2005 GTO Owner

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,809
Premium Member


Offline
Then wouldn't you also include the force of the caliper pushing back on the pad even when there aren't any pistons as determined by Newton's Third Law of Motion?
__________________


The Car: '05 YJ M6
Go Mods: Lingenfelter CAI, Monster 2.5, Kooks LT headers/mids, SLP Predator, Corsa Touring, MGW-P
Suspension Mods: Harrop Diff Cover, Lovells Springs, Koni Sport Adjustables, Pedders strut and front RR bushings
Appearance Mods: Liquidome rear inserts and me behind the wheel
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 10:18 AM   #153
HunterKiller89
Ecotec tech
 
HunterKiller89's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles area)
Posts: 2,126


Offline
Send a message via AIM to HunterKiller89
Quote:
Originally Posted by seawolf06...View Post
Then wouldn't you also include the force of the caliper pushing back on the pad even when there aren't any pistons as determined by Newton's Third Law of Motion?

while the force exists, it isn't useful to us...
methinks you need to better understand the 3rd law.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 06:08 PM   #154
Fourman
not as cool as fiveman
 
Fourman's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 1,075


Offline
Send a message via AIM to Fourman
If two pistons of X area in a sliding caliper travel Y distance to initiate pad contact, why would twice as many pistons of X area in a fixed caliper traveling .5Y distance to initiate be any different? The total fluid displacement required to provide the squeeze is the same in either, is it not?
__________________
5XX/5XX at the wheels. stock-ish.
DYNO! DIY Dual Gauge Bezel
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 07:00 PM   #155
HunterKiller89
Ecotec tech
 
HunterKiller89's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles area)
Posts: 2,126


Offline
Send a message via AIM to HunterKiller89
This is getting so complicated. I'm going back to the beginning. The original claim was a 4pot fixed and a 2pot floating of equal piston sizes (IE fixed has 2x more area) will have equal clamping force with equal line pressures, which isn't true.
As per A StopTech FAQ:
Quote:
3) Clamping force: The clamping force of a caliper is the force exerted on the disc by the caliper pistons. Measured in pounds clamping force, it is the product of brake line pressure, in psi, multiplied by the total piston area of the caliper in square inches. This is true whether the caliper is of fixed or floating design. Increasing the pad area will not increase the clamping force.

2) Brake line pressure: Brake line pressure is the hydraulic force that actuates the braking system when the pedal is pushed. Measured in English units as pounds per square inch (psi), it is the force applied to the brake pedal in pounds multiplied by the pedal ratio divided by the area of the master cylinder in square inches. For the same amount of force, the smaller the master cylinder, the greater the brake line pressure.

So, in a 4pot system, brake line pressure is determined by force applied to brake pedal * pedal force multiplication / master cyl piston area. The last two variables are constants for our car, so really line pressure is determined by pressure on the brake pedal. Because equal line pressures will yield different clamping forces between a 2pot floating and 4pot fixed due to different piston areas, and we know that the sum of all forces must equal zero in our system, then the pedal input force must be higher for the 4pot to explain the clamping force also being higher.

This makes sense, because if you look at it backwards, the resistance of application that the rotors are applying back on the pistons (this is Newton's 3rd law btw for whoever brought it up earlier) is analogous to pedal force, piston area analogous to master cyl area, and as per Stoptech, the smaller the master cyl, the greater the line pressure, which will mean greater resistance on the driver's end in the pedal. This will feel like a greater overall force required at the pedal to overcome the line pressure resistance caused by the action-reaction pair.

Breaking it down to once sentence:
As per the Stoptech quote, more piston area results in higher clamping forces per unit line pressure at the expense of more pedal force required per unit pressure, and since work = force * distance, and we have a constant distance to work with, we can equate the higher pedal force requirements (work in) as resulting in higher clamping loads at the rotor (work out) due to conservation of energy for any given pedal displacement.

Fourman, what you say is true, but that only means the pads will come in contact with the rotor at the same amount of pedal travel in a 2pot floating vs 4pot fixed. It does not address the forces once contact has been established. As a side note: the floating caliper will have the inside pad (or w/e pad has pistons actuating it) contact the rotor with only half the pedal distance requirement, but this pad will not exhibit a clamping force until the caliper body has moved enough that the outer pad has contacted the outer surface of the rotor as well. There will be a small amount of friction after the first pad contacts and before the 2nd pad contacts, but it would only be whatever clamping load is required to make the caliper body move (very very little ideally), so there would be very small Normal forces resulting in very small frictional forces until the 2nd pad comes in contact.



I hope this is all consistent with what I have been saying, as I believe it is. I knew the results, and tried to justify them with my current physics knowledge. The Stoptech FAQ made it a lot clearer for me to explain though, and provides a reputable source as support for my statements.

Last edited by HunterKiller89; 12-12-2012 at 07:41 PM.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2012, 02:56 PM   #156
MTung
Registered User
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Ann Arbor MI
Posts: 109


Offline
Props to everyone in this thread. This is a really good discussion.

That's really interesting about the rears wearing so quick. Just a theory. Someone did mention the brake controller getting tripped up by the new brake system. Since the fronts are so prone to locking the brake module is dumping pressure to keep them from slipping too deep. Which is normal, but because the volume of your calipers is different the response times are different, the brake torque vs. brake pressure is different etc. So the system ends up like an underdamped system constantly overshooting it's slip target, because its model is off. As a result the front acts inefficiently.

I think this is why stopping distances usually aren't improved by big brake kits. The ABS comp. just can't understand.

Again just an idea.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2012, 03:13 PM   #157
Quiksilver
Grumpy Bastage
 
Quiksilver's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Auburn Hills, MI
Posts: 2,294


Offline
He said the abnormal ABS went away after the rotor was trued.
__________________
2004 Pontiac GTO, Quicksilver/Ebony
Mods: Monaro conversion and a whiney bitch under the hood. 170,000 miles. More broken driveline parts than 10 GTOs combined.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2012, 03:54 PM   #158
HunterKiller89
Ecotec tech
 
HunterKiller89's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles area)
Posts: 2,126


Offline
Send a message via AIM to HunterKiller89
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTung...View Post
Props to everyone in this thread. This is a really good discussion.

That's really interesting about the rears wearing so quick. Just a theory. Someone did mention the brake controller getting tripped up by the new brake system. Since the fronts are so prone to locking the brake module is dumping pressure to keep them from slipping too deep. Which is normal, but because the volume of your calipers is different the response times are different, the brake torque vs. brake pressure is different etc. So the system ends up like an underdamped system constantly overshooting it's slip target, because its model is off. As a result the front acts inefficiently.


I think this is why stopping distances usually aren't improved by big brake kits. The ABS comp. just can't understand.

Again just an idea.

I like the bolded part. I don't know if it's true, but it sounds logical enough.

As for the underlined part,
Quote:
While almost every current passenger car is capable of a single stop from maximum speed at or near the limit of tire adhesion, the braking systems of most passenger vehicles and light trucks and some sports cars are not adequate for hard or sport driving or for towing. Most stock brake systems lack sufficient thermal capacity - the system's ability to absorb and transfer heat by conduction, convection and radiation into the air or surrounding structure during severe driving.

1) The brakes don't stop the vehicle - the tires do. The brakes slow the rotation of the wheels and tires. This means that braking distance measured on a single stop from a highway legal speed or higher is almost totally dependent upon the stopping ability of the tires in use - which, in the case of aftermarket advertising, may or may not be the ones originally fitted to the car by the OE manufacturer.

EDIT: just read quicksilver's post

Last edited by HunterKiller89; 12-13-2012 at 04:09 PM.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 11:13 AM   #159
Havoc
Don't drink the Kool-Aid...
 
2005 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,858


Offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterKiller89...View Post
This is getting so complicated. I'm going back to the beginning. The original claim was a 4pot fixed and a 2pot floating of equal piston sizes (IE fixed has 2x more area) will have equal clamping force with equal line pressures, which isn't true.

I hope this is all consistent with what I have been saying, as I believe it is. I knew the results, and tried to justify them with my current physics knowledge. The Stoptech FAQ made it a lot clearer for me to explain though, and provides a reputable source as support for my statements.

Everything you have been saying IS consistent BUT if I'm understanding you correctly I believe it's all based on an incorrect hypothesis...
You believe a 4pot fixed and a 2pot floating of equal piston sizes do not actually have the same surface area, IE fixed has 2x more area, correct? And that the two require different line pressure to achieve the same clamping force?

Again, I think you are totally discounting the body of a 2 pot floating caliper having to move in the opposite direction effectively using the back walls of the piston bores as "pistons". That's why only one bank of pistons need be counted when making a comparison between the two...

Since we're trusting StopTech's info:

Formulas for Vehicle Braking Dynamics
1. Torque created by the caliper on the rotor (at the wheel) = TW
TW = PS x AP x μ x 2 x RE

PS = Pressure of system; AP = Total Area of pistons in one half of caliper (one side of opposed type or active (piston) side of sliding or floater type); μ = Friction Coefficient; x 2, since there are two sides of the rotor that the pads are exerting force against; RE = Effective Radius of clamping force.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-21-2012, 02:08 PM   #160
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
__________________
2006 Monaro 18/A4
386HP/376TQ Heintz Racing Tune - 1/4th 12.4@113
- .218/.222 .601 Cam, Lunati HighRPM Lifters, Ported/Milled 243s, UDP, Oil Baffle, Comp Trunnions, K&N CAI, ARP Bolts, Catless JBA Shorties
- RE-11s, V2 Brembos, Coilovers, Bushings, Fastrack, Swaybars, ARP Studs, 15lbs Braille
- Manual 4l65e, Anti-Hop Axles, 3.5" Alum DS, TrueTrac, 3.73s, Harrop Cover, Sparco Evo2s
- Ron Davis Radiator, Derale PS/Trans Coolers, JBiz CatchCan, Russell Lines, AeroForce, Bel RX65
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2012, 12:24 PM   #161
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Rear brakes ready for paint.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 11:25 AM   #162
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 11:48 AM   #163
Havoc
Don't drink the Kool-Aid...
 
2005 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,858


Offline
G2 paint?
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 12:23 PM   #164
high school goat
Retarded Spark
 
high school goat's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Charlotte N.C.
Posts: 2,804


Offline
Send a message via AIM to high school goat
The yellow will look killer with the red.
__________________
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 01:49 PM   #165
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Havoc...View Post
G2 paint?

Yup. Unsure if I like it; the brushing on is really half assed.

Last edited by miker; 12-28-2012 at 03:06 PM.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 01:51 PM   #166
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Quote:
Originally Posted by high school goat...View Post
The yellow will look killer with the red.

  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 02:03 PM   #167
Audacious Nick
Savannah Katz!
 
Audacious Nick's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 2,497


Offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by miker...View Post

Nice GTO body kit!
__________________
2004 GTO- The Hybrid-530rwhp 466 rwtq-8.66psi

Mods:
  • Not Stock mufflers
  • Not stock Spark Plugs
  • Not stock Headers
  • Not stock bushings
  • Not stock shocks
  • Not stock tune
  • Not stock heads
  • Not stock CAI that produces 9psi
  • Not stock fuel setup
  • Not stock Semen injectors
  • 93 octane fuel
  • fuel pressure gauge
  • Not stock air filter
  • not stock Belts
  • not stock tires

2008 Corvette- The Honda
Stock- 11.718@119.94(this is my car's capability)
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 03:00 PM   #168
ddawson
Purple Administrator
 
ddawson's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: San Mateo, Bay Area, CA.
Posts: 12,705
Premium Member


Offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by miker...View Post
Yup. Unsure if I like it; the bushing on is really half assed.

It should smooth out and look great unless the paint started to cure when you did a second coat.
__________________
1969 Corvette, 427 Convertible
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2012, 03:06 PM   #169
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson...View Post
It should smooth out and look great unless the paint started to cure when you did a second coat.

It looks ok currently; going to let it cure a couple days then wet sand.

Apply the stickers then clear coat.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 07:34 AM   #170
Siliev
Registered User
 
Siliev's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 240


Offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourman...View Post
If two pistons of X area in a sliding caliper travel Y distance to initiate pad contact, why would twice as many pistons of X area in a fixed caliper traveling .5Y distance to initiate be any different? The total fluid displacement required to provide the squeeze is the same in either, is it not?

I think you are perfectly right. On a floating caliper the pistons have to travel first the distance from the pad on the piston side to the rotor and then the distance from the opposite pad to the rotor as well while the caliper is "floating" so that both pads apply pressure on the rotor. With the 4 piston caliper, the pistons on each side have to travel only one pad to rotor distance in order for the pads to contact the rotor from both sides. So.. in a four piston fixed caliper, the pistons on each side have to travel only half of the distance that the pistons of a floating 2 piston caliper have to travel. So same amount of fluid needed and same amount of pedal travel needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Havoc...View Post
Everything you have been saying IS consistent BUT if I'm understanding you correctly I believe it's all based on an incorrect hypothesis...
You believe a 4pot fixed and a 2pot floating of equal piston sizes do not actually have the same surface area, IE fixed has 2x more area, correct? And that the two require different line pressure to achieve the same clamping force?

Again, I think you are totally discounting the body of a 2 pot floating caliper having to move in the opposite direction effectively using the back walls of the piston bores as "pistons". That's why only one bank of pistons need be counted when making a comparison between the two...

Since we're trusting StopTech's info:

Formulas for Vehicle Braking Dynamics
1. Torque created by the caliper on the rotor (at the wheel) = TW
TW = PS x AP x μ x 2 x RE

PS = Pressure of system; AP = Total Area of pistons in one half of caliper (one side of opposed type or active (piston) side of sliding or floater type); μ = Friction Coefficient; x 2, since there are two sides of the rotor that the pads are exerting force against; RE = Effective Radius of clamping force.

This is correct, however, the only thing that equation doesn't account for is the friction within the floating caliper which would actually slightly reduce the clamping force on the rotor as opposed to a fixed caliper where the only sliding friction would come from the pistons sliding within their bores. So the fixed calipers may have a little more clamping force due to less friction in the clamping direction. And also I think that it was mentioned at one point that the total area on one side of the brembo caliper is just a little more than that of the stock caliper. Finally, the slightly larger radius of the rotor used with these calipers would increase the torque a little more.

But most importantly as mentioned earlier in this thread, the point of big brake kits really is to reduce brake fade due to the larger rotors. The actual braking distances from speeds even up to 70 80 mph would be the same as even the stock brakes would be able to reach the limit of the tires at those speeds.

That's my take on the issue. Thanks for listening
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 08:26 AM   #171
Siliev
Registered User
 
Siliev's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 240


Offline
On second thought, the larger clamping force will help when braking from higher speeds such as 100+ mph and with these cars I would be surprised and question anyone who says they havent gone that fast on the street. So I want these! But I would love if I can use them with a larger rotor which fits the hub with no modifications :/ what are the limits on the rotors you can use with this caliper set up? As in min and max diameter and thickness? What if I can find a larger diameter rotor to fit my dba 5000 series hat from my dba 5000's right now?
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 08:32 AM   #172
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siliev...View Post
On second thought, the larger clamping force will help when braking from higher speeds such as 100+ mph and with these cars I would be surprised and question anyone who says they havent gone that fast on the street. So I want these! But I would love if I can use them with a larger rotor which fits the hub with no modifications :/ what are the limits on the rotors you can use with this caliper set up? As in min and max diameter and thickness? What if I can find a larger diameter rotor to fit my dba 5000 series hat from my dba 5000's right now?

The issue is the offset; you could get a Z06 DBA 5000 to work in the rear but you would need new wheels with more caliper clearance.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 08:39 AM   #173
Siliev
Registered User
 
Siliev's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 240


Offline
Darn it.. because I really love my dba's and I feel like you need to have a two piece rotor if you really wanna use the brakes hard.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 08:40 AM   #174
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siliev...View Post
Darn it.. because I really love my dba's and I feel like you need to have a two piece rotor if you really wanna use the brakes hard.

I've been racing for years and never used a 2piece rotor. 99% of people use the cheapest blank rotors then can find while on track.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 08:49 AM   #175
Siliev
Registered User
 
Siliev's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 240


Offline
Hmm.. well since you have the experience I will take your word for it. I only tracked my car once with the dba 5000s bought specifically for that event and ive driven on them for over a year after that and they have no vibration under breaking where my stock one piece rotors seemed to warp and cause bad vibrations after only one stop from 100+ mph. That's why I thought two piece rotors were the way to go.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 09:33 AM   #176
miker
'12-'13 ScrScca SM Champ
 
miker's Avatar
 
Monaro CV8

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,390


Offline
Send a message via AIM to miker Send a message via MSN to miker Send a message via Yahoo to miker
The idea is buy expensive pads that last a long time but are hard on rotors. Then just run $50 blanks and throw them away every couple events
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 10:16 AM   #177
Quiksilver
Grumpy Bastage
 
Quiksilver's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Auburn Hills, MI
Posts: 2,294


Offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siliev...View Post
Hmm.. well since you have the experience I will take your word for it. I only tracked my car once with the dba 5000s bought specifically for that event and ive driven on them for over a year after that and they have no vibration under breaking where my stock one piece rotors seemed to warp and cause bad vibrations after only one stop from 100+ mph. That's why I thought two piece rotors were the way to go.

The whole point behind two-piece rotors is weight savings. The rotor is no more or less resistant to runout issues. But, if you have really good 2pc rotor mounts, the floating type, they have the ability to center in the caliper at all times when the brakes are applied, lessening any vibration issues usually.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 12:49 PM   #178
HunterKiller89
Ecotec tech
 
HunterKiller89's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles area)
Posts: 2,126


Offline
Send a message via AIM to HunterKiller89
2 piece rotors are more resistant to warping though, as it allows the rotor to expand in a more uniform fashion, whereas a 1 piece will want to curve one way or the other as it expands. They also keep the heat in the rotor and out of the hub, and are lighter as you said.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 12:55 PM   #179
high school goat
Retarded Spark
 
high school goat's Avatar
 
2004 GTO Owner

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Charlotte N.C.
Posts: 2,804


Offline
Send a message via AIM to high school goat
99.9% percent of people will never run their car hard enough to experience any gain from two piece rotors.
  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 03:00 PM   #180
Afroman
06 Cyclone GTO
 
Afroman's Avatar
 
2006 GTO Owner

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Richmond Hill, Ga
Posts: 2,222


Offline
I am curious if using the brake master cylinder out of a CTS-V or Camaro would be beneficial to do. It seems like you have everything else like the CTS-V or Camaro, and it would be good to replace a 6+ year old part. Just a thought though, and I may not be correct.
__________________
2006 CGM A4 Gone but not forgotten.
2006 IBM M6 New GTO!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaEden...View Post
you're quite the manwhore now aren't you

Quote:
Originally Posted by mike5215@bellsouth.n...View Post
Owing a GTO is like marrying a stripper. You know it's wrong and it's going to end badly, but the sex is so hot you can't help yourself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brians Goat...View Post
No he ain't doing no freaking manwhoring, he has a collar around his neck lately, he rarely shows up anymore on Saturday's and when he does he usually has some HOT babe with him who causes him to constantly drool and walk funny!!!!!!!

  Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the LS1GTO.com Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:33 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2003-2008, LS1GTO.com
Site Banner Design 2005-2007, Cylosoft

LS1GTO.com is not affiliated with General Motors Corp.