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I've been slowly fixing up my '04 that I picked up a few months ago, and after getting the entirety of the front suspension rebuilt/replaced and fixed the exhaust, new wheels and tires, dyno-tuned, fluid flushed, etc. I'm getting ready to fix up the rear suspension.

I have new g-force Toe-Rods, peddlers shocks and springs and poly subframe bushings I'm planning on installing over the weekend.

Anyway, I noticed the driveshaft looks a little different than photos I've seen of other goats. First is that mine doesn't have a guibo and the rear flange was replaced with a yoked one that bolts straight to the differential. Is there a reason why the PO would've removed the guibo?

Also, is seems the 2pc DS is slightly angled at the CSB. I was able to loosen the bolts on the csb mount and adjust it to be less of an angle, it was more noticeable than in the picture. I imagine the driveshaft is supposes to be straight and in-line with the chassis, right?

I looked up the whole cradle alignment thing and it seems pretty intimidating, although with everything else I've noticed, and my vibration issues, I'm sure it needs one anyway.

Would anyone in AZ know of a shop that happens to still do that? I have a feeling it's very wishful thinking, or should I just stick with replacing one bushing at a time to reduce the likelihood of the cradle shifting more than it might already have?

And if you guys have any other tips or advice for a new goat owner, I'd appreciate it. I do check these forums and Google pretty much every day, learning as much as I can before making a post on here.
 

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GR-RRR!
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If you are having drivetrain vibrations, the lack of a guibo may be a contributing factor. The whole driveshaft looks aftermarket.

As far as rear cradle bushings, you really only want to change them one bushing at a time. You can measure the cradle for alignment without the special tool. If you are doing poly subframe bushings, you should also consider improving the connection at the rear of the differential whether you go with a bushing insert or one of the more fancy improved bushing replacements or even a Harrop rear cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you are having drivetrain vibrations, the lack of a guibo may be a contributing factor. The whole driveshaft looks aftermarket.

As far as rear cradle bushings, you really only want to change them one bushing at a time. You can measure the cradle for alignment without the special tool. If you are doing poly subframe bushings, you should also consider improving the connection at the rear of the differential whether you go with a bushing insert or one of the more fancy improved bushing replacements or even a Harrop rear cover.
If I were to go about doing them one at a time, I basically would just unbolt one mount and the 4 bolts for the differential mount and that should give it enough room to sag to fit a socket or something in between the mount and the frame to press it out, yeah? Then rebolt before dropping the other side?

And I have done the whiteline differential insert and revshift trans insert, and new engine mounts.
 

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GR-RRR!
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If I were to go about doing them one at a time, I basically would just unbolt one mount and the 4 bolts for the differential mount and that should give it enough room to sag to fit a socket or something in between the mount and the frame to press it out, yeah? Then rebolt before dropping the other side?

And I have done the whiteline differential insert and revshift trans insert, and new engine mounts.
I'd try to do it by just loosening the one bushing first, if that doesn't allow you to drop that arm of the subframe enough, loosen the differential bushing mount. On the differential bushing mount (and I hope you did this when you did the Whiteline insert) mark where the mount is and then when bolting it back up make sure you get it in the same place.

To align the entire subframe, locate the big holes in the arms the subframe about halfway from the diff to the outer bushing, then measure from that hole to another hole found in the body. There should be two holes in the body, one on either side, that are in the exact same place on each side. Then, measure from hole to hole and adjust the subframe until they are equal. This will get the subframe aligned to the body pretty well. The amount of movement of the subframe isn't really that substantial anyway. If you want to get really carried away, once you get the hole to hole alignments done, check the fit of the wheels in the wheel wells and make sure the rims are equal distances from the lip of the quarter panels. If they are within a fraction of an inch of each other I'd call it good (less than a 1/4" difference is pretty good, less than 1/8" is much better). When you are all said and done, having a thrust angle alignment done wouldn't hurt.

When I did the suspension and bushing work on the rear of my car I checked the subframe alignment and found it to be dead on without any manipulation. I did the one-bushing-at-a-time method.

Another tidbit, I found that the bushing bolt holes did not line up to with the bolts when I had the new bushing in and was ready to bolt the subframe back onto the car. I had to run a tow strap come-along between the rear wheel and the front wheel and pull the subframe into place to get the bolt stated. Kept it strapped in place until I snugged down the bolt. Also, these large bolts are considered TTY, but I reused them anyway and have never had a problem. Replace them with new if you feel the need and don't trust reusing a TTY bolt. I did clean off the old Loctite and used high strength Loctite on reassembly. These bolts will be REALLY hard to break loose by the way due to the install torque and the liberal use of Loctite by the factory.
 
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