LS1GTO Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
So how do you install them without screwing up the finish? I mean other than being very careful.
:drink::drink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
They look great. That is exactly what I had in mind doing. The company that does all of our E.P. owes me a favor :D .
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
Looks sweet. DY are you going for the show-car thing. Low miles, pristine appearance, etc. Let us know when you hit 1000 Miles. :D What kin' cam? Are you planning for S/C down the road or keep it N/A beast?
 

·
Can't help ya, Sorry.
Joined
·
14,481 Posts
Sweet!

Did you use MIL or the other guy?

That finish should hold up well but I would cover them in streach wrap or the stuff they put on new cars for shipping before I installed them. Avoid any oops...

Cam? How have you kept that quiet? When are you doing that?
 

·
Gone but not forgotten
Joined
·
4,672 Posts
why tiny? if you are gonna do a cam, shouldn't you atlteast make it worth your time and money?
 

·
Captain Thread Killer returns
Joined
·
21,898 Posts
nice........what kind are they
 

·
Can't help ya, Sorry.
Joined
·
14,481 Posts
Electroploishing is not chroming. It is much cooler :D

The Stainless Steel parts are attached to an electrode and submerged in an acid bath. the Anode is in the tank and electricity is applied. eletricity flows from the part to the anode. This causes changes in the SS. First effect is to draw some of the carbon from outer layer. It also melts the surface slighty and the chrome in the Stainless at the surface is exposed and molten. This leaves a really shiny surface that is slightly harder than the original SS. It also is more resistant to oxidation. (sp?) There is some metal loss but it is usualy less than .0005 inches

That may not be 100% correct it is just the breif explination I received a year ago. We use it in the medical manufacturing industry for many of the product contact systems.

Chroming invloves layering metal on the part, (I think the order is Copper, Nickel then Chrome) and adds to the part. It is much more expensive. the final results are aproxamatly the same in apperace. This is also an electrical process but the current flows in reverse and the baths are copper soulution, nickel soulution exc. I think Chrome leaves a harder surface but EP'd metals can not chip and flake like a Chromed part.
 

·
Gone but not forgotten
Joined
·
4,672 Posts
sxty8goats said:
Electroploishing is not chroming. It is much cooler :D

The Stainless Steel parts are attached to an electrode and submerged in an acid bath. the Anode is in the tank and electricity is applied. eletricity flows from the part to the anode. This causes changes in the SS. First effect is to draw some of the carbon from outer layer. It also melts the surface slighty and the chrome in the Stainless at the surface is exposed and molten. This leaves a really shiny surface that is slightly harder than the original SS. It also is more resistant to oxidation. (sp?) There is some metal loss but it is usualy less than .0005 inches

That may not be 100% correct it is just the breif explination I received a year ago. We use it in the medical manufacturing industry for many of the product contact systems.

Chroming invloves layering metal on the part, (I think the order is Copper, Nickel then Chrome) and adds to the part. It is much more expensive. the final results are aproxamatly the same in apperace. This is also an electrical process but the current flows in reverse and the baths are copper soulution, nickel soulution exc. I think Chrome leaves a harder surface but EP'd metals can not chip and flake like a Chromed part.
ah, ok, so its similar, yet diferent :p

oh, and i believe that the process for chroming is acid bath, nickel, chrome.

or for copper it would be acid, nickel, copper.
but im only about 95% about that.
 

·
Mod Hungry... Empty Wallet
Joined
·
2,137 Posts
:thumbs: Those are freakin awesome Jon :thumbs:
 

·
Can't help ya, Sorry.
Joined
·
14,481 Posts
GTOdriver7 said:
ah, ok, so its similar, yet diferent :p

oh, and i believe that the process for chroming is acid bath, nickel, chrome.

or for copper it would be acid, nickel, copper.
but im only about 95% about that.
I know there is a primary layer of copper in chrome jobs that are done on plastic parts. They may not use it on metals I'm not sure.
 

·
Can't help ya, Sorry.
Joined
·
14,481 Posts
I have half a mind to pull mine back off and send them out. I keep going back to the top of the thread to look at them.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top