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Discussion Starter #1
I waited to post this thread because I did not want to appear as though I was hyping for a sale I had posted, so now that the sale has gone through, here's my findings:

I had 2 JL 8's mounted in the rear deck (see BJSUBERT's thread). I blew them, and then replaced them with a JL 10 in the trunk (custom box was made for the 10).

Both of the sub setups sounded good, but make no mistake about it, the 8's were a better setup. The 10 has all the sound you need, but the 8's mounted in the rear deck has 'presence' - I mean it felt like John Bonham's kick peddle was mounted on the back of my seat!

In short, the 10's play a bit lower in the trunk (and are fine), but the 8's mounted in the deck ROCK!

Ok, hope this helps folks in the decision process, but do be careful, because the JL 8's in free air can't take as much power as they would in a box (recall that I shredded both of mine).
:gears:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No doubt that the QP's are likely a great place to mount subs (10's or 8's) , and probably sounds great, but I'm not a DIY, so price does play in here (having the stereo shop do an install to the QP's would be really, really pricey).

The rear deck and trunk options are much more affordable (for those of us not belssed with DIY skills).
 

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RED2005GTO said:
No doubt that the QP's are likely a great place to mount subs (10's or 8's) , and probably sounds great, but I'm not a DIY, so price does play in here (having the stereo shop do an install to the QP's would be really, really pricey).

The rear deck and trunk options are much more affordable (for those of us not belssed with DIY skills).

In that case, I'd go with the trunk mount. Subs designed for closed enclosures in free air don't work all that well. IMO
 

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I had a 10" JL in the trunk originally, but the thing was impossible to tame. Too broad a spread between the cabin speaker's bottom end and the sub's high end. If the sub was tuned to bring in more midbass, it got sloppy. If it was cut off to the point it stayed tight, the mix was too thin.

I ended up splitting the sub signal, sending it to two 6.5" Goldwoods in the rear deck driven by a small JL amp (60 x2). The other signal went to an Infiniti Basslink in the trunk. (Powered sub, 200w with a 10" driver and a 10" passive radiator) I set the Infiniti to play very low, and kept the gain low as well. I also reversed phase on the sub signal at the HU, and reversed it back on the Infiniti. So the Goldwoods are reversed and the Infiniti is normal.

Two 6.5 inch woofers in the deck paired with a 10 inch sub in the trunk gives a nice tight range for the bottom end, and puts all of the bass squarely inside the cabin, adding a lot of the fullness and midbass I was missing with just a sub in the trunk, and a lot of the bottom end kick I couldn't get with just the Goldwoods. (Also, too much lows in the Goldwoods caused a lot of sympathetic rattles in the deck.)

I experimented for awhile trying to get a good soundstage. If I kept the fader centered, the sound was full but the stage was behind me. I ended up with the fader nearly full front (6.5 components). This put the stage where I wanted it, and I fed more to the Goldwoods to increase the rear fill. The 6.5 coaxials in the rear now serve mainly to bring a hint of the mids and highs to either side of the stage, giving the impression that the stage is still in front but very wide. Separation is amazing.

I also discovered that pushing the fader nearly full front brought the bass up front as well. It's well known that bass is omnidirectional, so theoretically a sub can be placed anywhere and still sound like it's with the rest of the drivers. But to get that to really happen with a sub in the trunk, you have to manage the highs/mids carefully. Low end in rock/jazz/pop is almost exclusively the domain of the bass (kick) drum and the bass guitar.


When the kick drum is struck, and the pedal mallet makes contact with the drum head, it makes a quick high-frequency sound, like a slap. It's followed instantly by the very low end sound of the head making its incursion into the shell. (That's the "hit" people refer to). If you can get the "slap" into the front soundstage, it will give the illusion that the kick drum is up in front, even though your seatback shakes with each hit from the sub in the trunk. All of the drums have this component to some degree. For example, if Neal Peart does a cool fill across the tom toms, and your highs are managed correctly, you'll hear the sound moving right to left in front of you as he makes his way down the kit, even though the bottom end of the tom tom sound is actually coming from behind you.

Likewise, when a bass guitar string is struck, there is an instant high-frequency sound caused by the bassist's finger plucking the string over the guitar's electric pick-up(s). Having the attacks of both the drums and bass guitar up front gives the illusion that those instruments are up front. My goal when setting up the lows is for me to be able to hear the bassline distinctly as individual notes, and feel the kick drum with each strike.
 
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