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Discussion Starter #1
I installed a 160* hypertech thermostat today. It was a pain in my butt. I jacked up the driverside and got under the passengerside to remove the small hose for the coolant. As I pulled the hose the coolant went everywhere but into my bucket. My arm was covered in antifreeze. After cussing for a few seconds I managed to get most of the coolant in to the bucket. All the extra coolant that was in the overflow poured in to the bucket. After that mess the thermostat was a 5 minute job to install. My only problem was after I installed and tightened everything up I had some coolant left over and i'm not talking about the stuff left on the floor. So I know I have air trapped in the system but I don't know how to get it out. I drove the car for about an hour today and the coolant level in the overflow didn't change.

As I was driving I noticed on my predator that the engine temp would be anywhere from 175* to 190* depending on fast I was driving. Once the fans kicked on at 190* the coolant temp would drop really fast to about 180*.

I'm glad I installed it. I think it will make a difference. I just want to wait until tomorrow to check the level again and try to make sure all the air is out of the system.
 

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be sure and post how you do it, I think I have air in the system from when I bypassed the tb and I'd like to get it out.
 

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GTOholic
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CMNTMXR gave me a tip worth its weight in gold... he suggested I buy a pair of "hose clamp pliers." I picked them up at Sears for less than $20.00 and they work great. They "pinch off" the coolant hose right at the t-stat housing and help keep most of the coolant in the system.

As for the air in the system, there is a specific procedure for purging the air. I would describe that procedure here, but I don't have the checklist in front of me and I don't want to get it wrong. It isn't difficult. Perhaps a forum member who is retired and has a service manual can post that for us... OLD GOAT? :D
 

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U.S. Army Retired
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I am curious as to which powerstat you used since I e-mailed Hypertech the other day and this is the response I received from techsupport.

:confused:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Kenneth Meyer [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Friday, June 04, 2004 11:47 AM
To: techsupport
Subject: Powerstat Application



I own a 2004 Pontiac GTO with an LS1 engine. It seems that mid-production year, GM changed the thermostat. The early production models took the Hypertech 1014 powerstat but the later production models have a thermostat that is separate from the housing. Could you tell me if the Hypertech 1008 powerstat will fit my car?


Ken Meyer
[email protected]
Gloucester, VA


Ken

No sir, this stat will not work and we do not have one available at this time. We are in search of the new stats ourselves at this time. Thanks

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My vin is a 175***. Thats a early production water pump so its the old style thermostat. There is a link about the thermostats and what people think the cut off is.
 

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speed_demon_freak said:
My vin is a 175***. Thats a early production water pump so its the old style thermostat. There is a link about the thermostats and what people think the cut off is.
175-176 seems to be the cutoff area. It's REALLY early in the run.
 

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FLORIT said:
CMNTMXR gave me a tip worth its weight in gold... he suggested I buy a pair of "hose clamp pliers." I picked them up at Sears for less than $20.00 and they work great. They "pinch off" the coolant hose right at the t-stat housing and help keep most of the coolant in the system.

As for the air in the system, there is a specific procedure for purging the air. I would describe that procedure here, but I don't have the checklist in front of me and I don't want to get it wrong. It isn't difficult. Perhaps a forum member who is retired and has a service manual can post that for us... OLD GOAT? :D
I don't want to sound ignorant but how critical is it to get any air out of the system?
 

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Not ignorant at all... it's a good question and I'm not sure of the answer. I know air in the system is a "bad thing", but I'm not sure why. I'm sure it has adverse effects on the cooling system. Pockets of air probably get "super heated" and screws up all kinds of stuff. It may even block coolant flow.

I'm just guessing. I really have no idea. I just know that everything I've read and heard mentions that getting the air out is real important.
 

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cjlannoy said:
I don't want to sound ignorant but how critical is it to get any air out of the system?
From GM CD SERVICE MANUAL 2004 GTO

Draining and Filling Cooling System
Draining Procedure

Caution
With a pressurized cooling system, the coolant temperature in the radiator can be considerably higher than the boiling point of the solution at atmospheric pressure. Removal of the surge tank cap, while the cooling system is hot and under high pressure, causes the solution to boil instantaneously with explosive force. This will cause the solution to spew out over the engine, the fenders, and the person removing the cap. Serious bodily injury may result.


Park the vehicle on a level surface.
Remove the coolant pressure cap.
Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
Place a drain pan under the lower radiator hose.
Remove the lower radiator hose from the radiator.
Drain the cooling system.
Inspect the coolant.
Follow the appropriate procedure based on the condition of the coolant.
Normal in appearance--follow the filling procedure.
Discolored--follow the flush procedure. Refer to Manufactures instructions.
Filling Procedure
Connect the lower radiator hose.
Lower the vehicle.

Important
Use a 50/50 mixture of DEX-COOL antifreeze and deionized water.


Slowly fill the cooling system through the upper radiator hose with a 50/50 coolant mixture until the coolant comes out the coolant air bleed hose.
Fill the radiator with coolant through the surge tank opening to the full line.
Install the coolant pressure cap.
Start the engine.
Run the engine at 2,000-2,500 RPM until the engine reaches normal operating temperature.
Allow the engine to idle for 3 minutes.
Shut the engine OFF.
Allow the engine to cool.
Top off the coolant as necessary.
Inspect the concentration of the engine coolant.
Rinse away any excess coolant from the engine and the engine compartment.
Inspect the cooling system for leaks.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Document ID# 1224534
2004 Pontiac GTO
 

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GTOholic
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Thanks, Holeshot. They don't seem to stress "bleeding the air" at all. I'm trying to picture filling the coolant system "through the upper radiator hose." I need to go look at my car and see how that's possible.
 

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Knight Errant
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Throttle Body coolant tubes

FLORIT said:
CMNTMXR gave me a tip worth its weight in gold... he suggested I buy a pair of "hose clamp pliers." I picked them up at Sears for less than $20.00 and they work great. They "pinch off" the coolant hose right at the t-stat housing and help keep most of the coolant in the system.

As for the air in the system, there is a specific procedure for purging the air. I would describe that procedure here, but I don't have the checklist in front of me and I don't want to get it wrong. It isn't difficult. Perhaps a forum member who is retired and has a service manual can post that for us... OLD GOAT? :D
After everything is back in place
From a cold engine.
Looking at the engine from the front of the car, there are two coolant tubes that go to the throttle body. the one on the right goes from the throttle body to the air bleed pipe on the front of the engine from side to side. This is the air bleed tube. To bleed, disconnect from the throttle body and hold your finger over the end and orient as vertically as possible. [If you've really dumped a lot of coolant, add coolant through the upper radiator hose.] As soon as coolant begins to come out the bleed tube, put your finger over it and quickly re-connect to the throttle body. Run the engine at 2,000 to 2,500 RPM until reaching operating temperature. Let cool and check coolant level at the overflow tank. Refill as necessary with a 50/50 mix of Dexcool and de-ionized water.
Make sure to thoroughly flush and rinse spilled coolant off your skin, the cooled engine, and the floor or driveway surface. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Holeshot said:
From GM CD SERVICE MANUAL 2004 GTO

Draining and Filling Cooling System
Draining Procedure

Caution
With a pressurized cooling system, the coolant temperature in the radiator can be considerably higher than the boiling point of the solution at atmospheric pressure. Removal of the surge tank cap, while the cooling system is hot and under high pressure, causes the solution to boil instantaneously with explosive force. This will cause the solution to spew out over the engine, the fenders, and the person removing the cap. Serious bodily injury may result.


Park the vehicle on a level surface.
Remove the coolant pressure cap.
Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
Place a drain pan under the lower radiator hose.
Remove the lower radiator hose from the radiator.
Drain the cooling system.
Inspect the coolant.
Follow the appropriate procedure based on the condition of the coolant.
Normal in appearance--follow the filling procedure.
Discolored--follow the flush procedure. Refer to Manufactures instructions.
Filling Procedure
Connect the lower radiator hose.
Lower the vehicle.

Important
Use a 50/50 mixture of DEX-COOL antifreeze and deionized water.


Slowly fill the cooling system through the upper radiator hose with a 50/50 coolant mixture until the coolant comes out the coolant air bleed hose.
Fill the radiator with coolant through the surge tank opening to the full line.
Install the coolant pressure cap.
Start the engine.
Run the engine at 2,000-2,500 RPM until the engine reaches normal operating temperature.
Allow the engine to idle for 3 minutes.
Shut the engine OFF.
Allow the engine to cool.
Top off the coolant as necessary.
Inspect the concentration of the engine coolant.
Rinse away any excess coolant from the engine and the engine compartment.
Inspect the cooling system for leaks.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Document ID# 1224534
2004 Pontiac GTO

Did you type all that out or did you copy and paste it?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Old Goat said:
After everything is back in place
From a cold engine.
Looking at the engine from the front of the car, there are two coolant tubes that go to the throttle body. the one on the right goes from the throttle body to the air bleed pipe on the front of the engine from side to side. This is the air bleed tube. To bleed, disconnect from the throttle body and hold your finger over the end and orient as vertically as possible. [If you've really dumped a lot of coolant, add coolant through the upper radiator hose.] As soon as coolant begins to come out the bleed tube, put your finger over it and quickly re-connect to the throttle body. Run the engine at 2,000 to 2,500 RPM until reaching operating temperature. Let cool and check coolant level at the overflow tank. Refill as necessary with a 50/50 mix of Dexcool and de-ionized water.
Make sure to thoroughly flush and rinse spilled coolant off your skin, the cooled engine, and the floor or driveway surface. ;)

Thanks for the info. I will try that tomorrow morning.
 

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speed_demon_freak said:
I installed a 160* hypertech thermostat today. It was a pain in my butt. I jacked up the driverside and got under the passengerside to remove the small hose for the coolant. As I pulled the hose the coolant went everywhere but into my bucket. My arm was covered in antifreeze. After cussing for a few seconds I managed to get most of the coolant in to the bucket. All the extra coolant that was in the overflow poured in to the bucket. After that mess the thermostat was a 5 minute job to install. My only problem was after I installed and tightened everything up I had some coolant left over and i'm not talking about the stuff left on the floor. So I know I have air trapped in the system but I don't know how to get it out. I drove the car for about an hour today and the coolant level in the overflow didn't change.

As I was driving I noticed on my predator that the engine temp would be anywhere from 175* to 190* depending on fast I was driving. Once the fans kicked on at 190* the coolant temp would drop really fast to about 180*.

I'm glad I installed it. I think it will make a difference. I just want to wait until tomorrow to check the level again and try to make sure all the air is out of the system.
Did you bleed it with the heater on ? Don't forget the heater hoses and core hold a fair amount of coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Old Goat- I did what you said and when I disconnected it, coolant came pouring out of the hose.

So I guess i have all the air out then.


Thanks
 

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Knight Errant
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Yup!

speed_demon_freak said:
Old Goat- I did what you said and when I disconnected it, coolant came pouring out of the hose.

So I guess i have all the air out then.


Thanks
That's the plan! Good deal! :D I think that air pockets are flushed out with the 2,000 to 2,500 RPM run up from cold to operating temp. At that point they should all be in the radiator, and as the engine cools, the expansion tank should backflow to fill, bit it never hurts to be sure.
 
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