LS1GTO Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
tterbo has a very nice thread going about his dragging and it has raised some questions for me. He wrote,

"We experimented flashing the converter and foot braking it and the best result was foot braking it at 2600 rpm. I started with a 1500 rpm launch, then 2000, then 2600. Each time it ran a quicker ET so a looser converter might even yield better times if the tires hold traction. I had a 3500 stall in my WS6 and it was a little much for me on the street so I chose a smaller one this time and am much happier with the streetability."

What is meant by flashing the convertor, foot braking, and losser convertor? What is he trying to accomplish?
 

·
Nothing
Joined
·
53 Posts
Tails said:
tterbo has a very nice thread going about his dragging and it has raised some questions for me. He wrote,

"We experimented flashing the converter and foot braking it and the best result was foot braking it at 2600 rpm. I started with a 1500 rpm launch, then 2000, then 2600. Each time it ran a quicker ET so a looser converter might even yield better times if the tires hold traction. I had a 3500 stall in my WS6 and it was a little much for me on the street so I chose a smaller one this time and am much happier with the streetability."

What is meant by flashing the convertor, foot braking, and losser convertor? What is he trying to accomplish?
Without getting too technical, flashing the converter just means letting the car idle and then flooring it when you want to go. This usually allows the converter to "flash" to its specific stall speed and can hit the tires harder, sometimes netting a lower 60 ft/time. Foot braking is holding the brake pedal while the car is revved to a specific rpm. This stalls the converter so you can leave at a higher rpm. In the quote above, I was foot braking the converter at 1500, 2000, and 2600 and then letting off the brake as the gas pedal was floored. Most of the newer cars seem to yield better times when the converter is "flashed" but my best times came from foot braking it at 2600 rpm. I think that if the converter were "looser", meaning higher stall, the car would be even quicker. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
tterbo said:
Without getting too technical, flashing the converter just means letting the car idle and then flooring it when you want to go. This usually allows the converter to "flash" to its specific stall speed and can hit the tires harder, sometimes netting a lower 60 ft/time. Foot braking is holding the brake pedal while the car is revved to a specific rpm. This stalls the converter so you can leave at a higher rpm. In the quote above, I was foot braking the converter at 1500, 2000, and 2600 and then letting off the brake as the gas pedal was floored. Most of the newer cars seem to yield better times when the converter is "flashed" but my best times came from foot braking it at 2600 rpm. I think that if the converter were "looser", meaning higher stall, the car would be even quicker. Hope this helps.
foot braking = brake torquing which is the more widely used term when referring to revving an automatic transmission with your foot on the brake to stall the torque converter. Hope this helps. :thumbs:
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
I had a question about other terms, if you do not mind:
What is the difference between Super-Pro, Pro, and Sportsman?
Dial In?
ET?

I also wonder what my coverage is when it comes to doing the 'Test and Tune' reguarding my insurance. Is this covered by my regular insurance policy, or do I need to take out another expanded policy, just in case I get out of control, or if the guy in the other lane looses control and smacks into me?

I was told by the strip that I would need a helmet if my car will do less than 14 in the 1/4th mile. I know the car will do it, but I dont have much faith in my abilities the first time I go.

Thank you very much for your imput.
 

·
Chief Poncho
Joined
·
3,032 Posts
Do NOT let your insurance company know you are drag racing. They will drop you fast. You are on you own at the strip. The track will also make you sign a waiver that they are not responsible for anything that may happen to your car while racing.

Got to the NHRA link for some explanations. It would do a better job than me explaining it.
http://www.nhra.com/aboutnhr/classes.htm
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
nikivee said:
Do NOT let your insurance company know you are drag racing.
I figured that was the case, but thought that I would ask. Kinda has me worried though. Are there temporary insurance policies you can take out just for the track, or are you always stuck on your own?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
Warren said:
I figured that was the case, but thought that I would ask. Kinda has me worried though. Are there temporary insurance policies you can take out just for the track, or are you always stuck on your own?
Your insurance company will eventually found out if you take out a "temporary" (called a supplemental) insurance policy and your rates will skyrocket IF you are not dropped.
 

·
Chief Poncho
Joined
·
3,032 Posts
I really wouldn't worry about it. You would be surprised how safe it really is going down the strip. I mean you are only going in a straight line. Plus with a NEW car, I doubt anything will happen. Relax man. :D Dont' get all worked up or you will find yourself not having fun, and that is what it's all about in the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
nikivee said:
Relax man. :D Dont' get all worked up or you will find yourself not having fun, and that is what it's all about in the end.
So very true! :drink: Hell.........................it is more dangerous on an expressway with a lot of traffic than it is racing at the strip!

Btw nikivee, I like your avatar. :)
 

·
GTOholic
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
Yeah, I got to the Test and Tune track real early yesterday, so I took the time to read the waiver very carefully. In a nutshell it says, "You're on your own!" The two people I don't want to know about my drag racing are my insurance agent and the dealer's service manager. Although I have only been once, I have to agree with Nikivee and ReadyToRock. It is safer than the street, by far.
 

·
Resident 10-second Priest
Joined
·
8,959 Posts
You play, you pay.

The only time I've ever seen an insurance problem at the track was when a Civic ran with a fuel leak and blew up (everyone got out OK) - ahhh, the smell of burned-Civic in the morning. :)

But the bigger problem is with dealers - if you want warranty coverage and claim that damage done to an engine at the track was actually done while driving grandma to church, then you're scum.

It helps to have a good relationship with your dealer and the service department. I've told my dealer exactly what I'm doing and what I plan to do. They're thrilled and can't wait to see the supercharger covered under warranty :) . If I do something stupid, I pay. If it's a genuine problem with the car, they'll cover it under warranty, whether I was racing or not.

It's all about trust and honesty.

Padre
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
Hey Nikivee, How do the specialty insurers like Haggerty treat racing? I'm guessing you have collector insurance on your older horses, and not off-the-shelf Allstate.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top