LS1GTO.com Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
XBOX LIVE TAG = GTO2006
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Don't know if this was posted before or not but an interesting read.

http://www.vetteweb.com/tech/vemp_0612_ls2_crate_motor/index.html



LS1 vs LS2 Intake

"The first EFI intake to be tested was an old-style LS1 manifold. While no self-respecting LS2 owner would perform such a downgrade, we wanted to see just how much better the LS2 was thanits predecessor. Would the larger 90mm throttle opening pay dividends against the 78mm version used on the older manifold? As it turned out, the LS1 intake wasn't that far off. As expected, it made less peak power than the LS2 (476 hp versus 485 hp), but the power curves were virtuallyidentical from 3,000 rpm to 5,500 rpm. From 5,500 rpm to 6,500 rpm, the LS2 intake offered as much as 10 additional horsepower, but the LS1 unit actually produced an additional 2 lb-ft of peak torque (471 versus 469 lb-ft)."

LS2 vs LS1 Intake Dyno



LS6 vs LS2 Intake
"After running the LS1 intake, we were curious to see how a factory LS6 manifold would perform. As in the previous test, the manifold was equipped with a 78mm throttle body. Despite the 12mm handicap in throttle opening, the LS6 intake easily outperformed the larger LS2 unit, producing peak numbers of 489 hp and 481 lb-ft of torque. The LS6offered serious power gains from 4,500 rpm to 5,700 rpm but offered smaller gains as low as 3,800 rpm. We suspect that the smaller throttle opening was responsible for the drop in power past 6,000 rpm, but even out to 6,500 rpm, the LS6 outperformed the LS2 by at least a few horses. "

LS2 vs LS6 Intake Dyno




LS2 vs Fast 78mm and FAST 90mm Intakes

"Once we were finished with the factory offerings (we didn't bother to run the truck manifold, which will produce less peak power than the LS1 but more low-speed torque), we moved on to the aftermarket. Since FAST offers its Wilson-designed LSX manifold with two different throttle-opening sizes, we decided to follow up last month's test of a 90mm version by evaluating the 78mm version for this issue.
As with the previous manifolds, the air/fuel was dialed in to 13.0:1 and the timing kept constant at 28 degrees (more did not help). Equipped with the 78mm FAST intake, the LS2 peaked at 499 hp and 487 lb-ft of torque, just missing the 501 hp and 487 lb-ft produced in our last test by the larger 90mm version. The 78mm unit actually produced better power up to 3,700 rpm, but the two manifolds performed nearly identically from there on up. Compared with the factory LS2 intake, both of the LSX manifolds offered as much as 22 hp and 22 lb-ft, and they bettered the power output from 3,000 rpm all the way through 6,500 rpm. We suspect these power gains would only improve with the addition of a larger cam and CNC-ported heads."

Fast 78mm Dyno Result


Fast 90mm Dyno Result
 

Attachments

·
XBOX LIVE TAG = GTO2006
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Also LS2 Ported Intake Article

"According to GM, the LS2 manifold has a marginal increase in plenum volume over the LS6 and [has] similar runner shapes optimized for the 6.0L engine," says Pete Incaudo of VMax Motorsports. "What changed was the technology employed to produce the manifold. The LS1 and LS6 manifolds were produced using a 'lost core' plastic-molding process that produced a single-piece manifold."
"The lost-core process involves the use of a low-melting-temperature metal core, which is loaded into a plastic-molding tool, over-molded, and then melted out after the part is formed. Nylon 66 was the material used to produce the LS1 and LS6 manifolds. "The LS2 and LS7 manifolds utilize a more traditional plastic-injected-molding process that produces three different intake-manifold sections, which are then fitted together and vibration welded around the edges," says Incaudo.

Vibration welding, sometimes referred to as "sonic welding," involves melting the composite together after vibrating the materials to produce enough friction for a weld. Although the new manifold material looks similar to that used in an LS1 or LS6 unit, it's actually Nylon 6, a glass-filled polymer that is better suited to the vibration-welding process.

"After conducting numerous tests on our Superflow 600 flow bench to benchmark the LS6, LS2, and aftermarket manifolds, it was determined that the one fatal flaw of the LS2 design was that it allowed a minuscule amount of air to leak internally past the welds," says Incaudo. "As the combined head- and intake-flow requirements increased on modified engines, the problem was amplified, especially in the upper rpm range."

While it might be tempting to simply seal all of the leaking welds, welding the seams for a leak-free fit is actually quite difficult. Furthermore, the potential for failure when modifying the manifold using polymer-based adhesives is unacceptably high. "Rather than 'repair' the manifold, we developed a porting program that will flow more air, thus raising the power potential to levels typically seen only on high-dollar aftermarket intakes," says Incaudo. "On stock applications we normally see 5-10hp increases, with up to 20 hp available on engines with ported heads, higher-lift cams, and free-flowing exhaust."

Sold on an exchange basis, the ported LS2 intake retails for $300 shipped and carries PN VMax LS2 Port. For enthusiasts who need to purchase a new stock manifold, GM offers the LS2 unit under PN 89017648 for $421.61.

Follow along as we provide an overview of this stealthy, budget-friendly modification. Once that's done, we'll swap a ported manifold onto a stock, six-speed-equipped '06 C6 and gauge the results on a chassis dyno."

Dyno Results. Increase of 10.2hp and 9.2TQ on first run and later tested and got gains of 13.6hp and 13.7lbs tq
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Very good read, my brother mentioned this to my about my intake.
Would it be just porting the stock ls2 manifold or going with a fast 90 or ls6?
 

·
Don't smurf with clowns
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
So a ported LS6 intake with my LS2 throttle body will perform better than my ported LS2 intake?
 

·
GOATFEST 9 COMING SOON!!!
Joined
·
2,567 Posts
Stage 2 LS2 out flows a ported LS6... TPIS 90mm LS6 out flows a stage 2 LS2 and is basically a Fast 90/92.
 

·
GOATFEST 9 COMING SOON!!!
Joined
·
2,567 Posts
Exactly... and tbh the 102 is over kill in most situations, you can pick up a fast 92 for around 600 or so if you know where to look. Stage 2 LS2s are also cheap if you know who to buy them from... :secret:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
That is excellent information. I have a ported FAST 90 so I'm good.
 

·
Orphan Car Owner
Joined
·
2,791 Posts
"According to GM, the LS2 manifold has a marginal increase in plenum volume over the LS6 and [has] similar runner shapes optimized for the 6.0L engine," says Pete Incaudo of VMax Motorsports. "What changed was the technology employed to produce the manifold. The LS1 and LS6 manifolds were produced using a 'lost core' plastic-molding process that produced a single-piece manifold."
"The lost-core process involves the use of a low-melting-temperature metal core, which is loaded into a plastic-molding tool, over-molded, and then melted out after the part is formed. Nylon 66 was the material used to produce the LS1 and LS6 manifolds. "The LS2 and LS7 manifolds utilize a more traditional plastic-injected-molding process that produces three different intake-manifold sections, which are then fitted together and vibration welded around the edges," says Incaudo.

Vibration welding, sometimes referred to as "sonic welding," involves melting the composite together after vibrating the materials to produce enough friction for a weld. Although the new manifold material looks similar to that used in an LS1 or LS6 unit, it's actually Nylon 6, a glass-filled polymer that is better suited to the vibration-welding process.

"After conducting numerous tests on our Superflow 600 flow bench to benchmark the LS6, LS2, and aftermarket manifolds, it was determined that the one fatal flaw of the LS2 design was that it allowed a minuscule amount of air to leak internally past the welds," says Incaudo. "As the combined head- and intake-flow requirements increased on modified engines, the problem was amplified, especially in the upper rpm range."

While it might be tempting to simply seal all of the leaking welds, welding the seams for a leak-free fit is actually quite difficult. Furthermore, the potential for failure when modifying the manifold using polymer-based adhesives is unacceptably high. "Rather than 'repair' the manifold, we developed a porting program that will flow more air, thus raising the power potential to levels typically seen only on high-dollar aftermarket intakes," says Incaudo. "On stock applications we normally see 5-10hp increases, with up to 20 hp available on engines with ported heads, higher-lift cams, and free-flowing exhaust."

Sold on an exchange basis, the ported LS2 intake retails for $300 shipped and carries PN VMax LS2 Port. For enthusiasts who need to purchase a new stock manifold, GM offers the LS2 unit under PN 89017648 for $421.61.

Follow along as we provide an overview of this stealthy, budget-friendly modification. Once that's done, we'll swap a ported manifold onto a stock, six-speed-equipped '06 C6 and gauge the results on a chassis dyno."

Dyno Results. Increase of 10.2hp and 9.2TQ on first run and later tested and got gains of 13.6hp and 13.7lbs tq
Link to the entire article.

http://www.highperformancepontiac.com/tech/hppp_0712_ls2_intake_manifold_porting/index.html
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top