LS1GTO Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
I haven't tried their oil products, but I use their fuel additive religiously. It gets me about 5-10% better mileage and restores the lubricity of the fuel removed along with the aromatics. It will be in the GTO from the first tank.
As for oil, I plan to change the factory fill as soon as I get it home, fill up with good quality dino oil and a break-in additive containing soluble molybdenum which reduces shearing of rough contact surfaces. After break-in, it'll be Mobil 1, and at around 5K miles, I'll start adding 4 Oz Tufoil at each oil change. At that time, I'll change transmission and gear oil to synthetics, and add a small quantity of Tufoil there too. The combined effect should noticably reduce power losses in the engine and driveline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
Help a neophyte. Can you explain in more detail why are doing that? I want to do the best I can also.
:drink: :drink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
And what is Tufoil?
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
Tufoil is a PTFE-moly additive which has stood the test of time. Not to be confused with Slick-50 or any of the other "infomercial-run your engine without oil" additives. They use extremely fine (.5 to .05 micron) PTFE, their patent is a process that keeps the particles in suspension. Their marketing is very conservative.
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
Tails
The logic behind dumping the factory fill ASAP is that most of the metal crud in the oil is produced in the first few miles. The soluble moly (as opposed to insoluble, which plates metal surfaces and is not suitable for break-in) allows the microscopic "hills" on contact surfaces to bend over rather than shear off. Honda factory fill has a very high moly content. The Mobil 1 is just damn good oil that flows better and doesn't turn to sludge. The Tufoil causes severe friction modification, and by manufacturer's recommendation, should not be added until 5K or so, when the engine is fully seated. The synthetic ATF and gear lube has much better temperature stability and lower friction than mineral oil. The Tufoil added to the trans and rear end further reduces friction and lowers gearbox temperature without affecting synchros or limited-slip clutches or cones. Not suitable, however for automatic transmissions as the friction modification will cause slippage. Tufoil is interesting stuff. If you have an older engine where the idle speed is not computer controlled, pour 8 ounces into the crankcase of a idling motor, and within a couple of minutes, the idle speed will increase noticeably.
 

·
Yes, it has a car seat
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
Being in the plating industry, putting any molybdenum in my engine scares me a little. We have had companies use moly based lubricants in fabrication of fasteners that subsequently get heat treated. The moly degrades and leaves one of the nastiest black residues you've ever seen coating the parts. At that point it is near impossible to clean those parts. Have you had these engies apart? Have you seen any residues from breakdown of these moly particles? Ultimately the size of the particles and the overall composition of the lubricant is going to define the characteristics. I'm just wondering if there are any long-term negative effects?
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
rschumacherfan1 said:
I'm just wondering if there are any long-term negative effects?
As far as I have been able to ascertain, no. My own personal use of Tufoil has been positive. I have never torn my motors down, but there are plenty of users who have, and they report unusually clean motors, even with dino oil. There have been many flavors of moly containing products over the years, one of the more recent being Royal Purple synthetic oil, which is quite popular in drag racing circles. GM coats their compression rings with moly for its break-in characteristics. Not being a chemist, I know that molybdenum can come in a lot of different forms. My speculation on your experience with heat treating is that a reaction occurred between that particular compound and the treating atmosphere, or some temperature threshold was crossed that would not be encountered under normal circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Moly pastes in a tube are of course used as cam/engine assembly lubes on lobes, lifters,bearings but NOT rings/cylinder walls to prevent dry conditions during start up of newly built engines. You want the rings to seat early though, and the extra lubricity of the moly can prevent proper ring seating.
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts
The moly assembly lubes are the conventional MoS2 which will "plate" the metal because of the sulfur bond, making it ideal for dry starts of new cams, bearing journals, etc. A soluble moly does not have this plating property, and will not really prevent wear on an absolute basis, but rather promotes "flattening out" of high points rather than lopping them off, reducing scoring and contamination of the oil with microscopic metal particles.
 

·
May I quote you on that?
Joined
·
22,046 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Being in the plating industry, putting any molybdenum in my engine scares me a little.
Moly is in almost every motor oil on the market now.

It's best to stay clear of most additives. I'd probably run Auto-Rx after break-in, to clean EVERYTHING out, but that's it.

Want to learn more about oil;
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top