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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
This is my first post on here, but I've been searching for info on here about how to install an LS7 clutch in my 06 GTO like crazy. Not gonna lie, it was hard to find info about how to actually do it even though it seems to be popular. Also, it seems that the knowledge base articles are gone. From what I understood, I needed to keep the GTO pilot bearing and the GTO slave cylinder, and use the LS2/LS7 Corvette flywheel with the pressure plate and clutch disc. That's exactly what I installed. Please someone let me know if any of that sounds off. The install went pretty smoothly, until trying to get the last inch of the transmission to install on the bell housing. We got stuck there and it would not go in, even after greasing the input shaft a good amount and also making sure it was lined up with studs sticking out of the bell housing. It seemed like it was getting stuck on the pilot bearing since it was only the last inch. I know this part isn't recommended, but we decided to slowly and evenly both the transmission back in to get that last inch to go. It seemed to go in easily at that point. After getting everything installed, I now have a noise only when I push the clutch pedal in when the car is on, but not when it's off. It sounds like somethings rubbing. Do you guys have any ideas? Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Alex
 

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It will go in if it's lined up. It's a PITA, but it has to be exactly straight.

Greasing the input shaft is not recommended.

The alignment dowels sometimes get a little tight because of dirt and corrosion.

A noise with the clutch pedal pressed to the floor could either be the throwout bearing or the pilot bearing.
 

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I found a very well put together pdf showing how to install the LS7 clutch on here, but one thing I'll say about installing clutches that I've learned by experience- you can't just put the clutch alignment tool through the friction disc and bolt the pressure plate on. The weight of the friction disc actually pulls down on the alignment tool ever so slightly, but it doesn't take much to cause the input shaft to not want to slide right in. So when I put the alignment tool in I install the PP bolts hand tight then move the alignment tool up and down. You can see the friction disc move with it, so I just watch how high and low it moves and try to tighten the first couple PP bolts with the disc as close to the middle of said up and down movement as I can just by eyeballing it. If I recall I even sighted through the disc once I removed the alignment tool to make sure the pilot bearing was visually centered with the disc. Now, if you did that then excuse my bloviating. I've always done that but somewhat recently saw a video where someone said they do that so maybe it's much more common knowledge than I originally thought. Edit: this is also mentioned in that pdf

But if you didn't do that, I suppose it's possible that the input shaft was pushing up against the needles in the pilot bearing, and by forcing it they could be wrecked. Personally I would want to verify the condition of that pilot bearing if that is the case before it does damage to the input shaft.

I tried to find the ls7 clutch pdf but the link appears to be dead. There may be another thread somewhere that has it but I'll just attach it here if the site lets me.
 

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Those plastic alignment tools are junk.

I've compared my old (bent) input shaft against a straight edge, it appears that the slight bend is near the base. The splined section as well as the nose that fits into the ID of the pilot bearing is straight. I've thought about chopping the gear and bent area off and welding a handle to the splined end.

But, there would still be a tolarance between the ID of the pilot and OD of the nose of the shaft. So, you could still move it around. It might be better than a plastic tool but not exact.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks a lot! I didn't check the alignment because I assumed that the alignment tool was good enough. Lesson learned. I'll also replace the pilot bearing. Thanks again for this info and the pdf.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Those plastic alignment tools are junk.

I've compared my old (bent) input shaft against a straight edge, it appears that the slight bend is near the base. The splined section as well as the nose that fits into the ID of the pilot bearing is straight. I've thought about chopping the gear and bent area off and welding a handle to the splined end.

But, there would still be a tolarance between the ID of the pilot and OD of the nose of the shaft. So, you could still move it around. It might be better than a plastic tool but not exact.
Thanks for the tip and also confirming those alignment tools suck. I'll check if mine is bent now too. It seemed good before going in, but we'll see if I damaged it...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I found a very well put together pdf showing how to install the LS7 clutch on here, but one thing I'll say about installing clutches that I've learned by experience- you can't just put the clutch alignment tool through the friction disc and bolt the pressure plate on. The weight of the friction disc actually pulls down on the alignment tool ever so slightly, but it doesn't take much to cause the input shaft to not want to slide right in. So when I put the alignment tool in I install the PP bolts hand tight then move the alignment tool up and down. You can see the friction disc move with it, so I just watch how high and low it moves and try to tighten the first couple PP bolts with the disc as close to the middle of said up and down movement as I can just by eyeballing it. If I recall I even sighted through the disc once I removed the alignment tool to make sure the pilot bearing was visually centered with the disc. Now, if you did that then excuse my bloviating. I've always done that but somewhat recently saw a video where someone said they do that so maybe it's much more common knowledge than I originally thought. Edit: this is also mentioned in that pdf

But if you didn't do that, I suppose it's possible that the input shaft was pushing up against the needles in the pilot bearing, and by forcing it they could be wrecked. Personally I would want to verify the condition of that pilot bearing if that is the case before it does damage to the input shaft.

I tried to find the ls7 clutch pdf but the link appears to be dead. There may be another thread somewhere that has it but I'll just attach it here if the site lets me.
Thanks a lot! I didn't check the alignment because I assumed that the alignment tool was good enough. Lesson learned. I'll also replace the pilot bearing. Thanks again for this info and the pdf.
 

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Thanks for the tip and also confirming those alignment tools suck. I'll check if mine is bent now too. It seemed good before going in, but we'll see if I damaged it...
I doubt it, unless yours was already bent somehow. It would take a lot of force to bend it. At worst you probably trashed your pilot bearing. I am still wondering how mine was damaged.

The good news is that it's easy to replace if it is.
 

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I doubt it, unless yours was already bent somehow. It would take a lot of force to bend it. At worst you probably trashed your pilot bearing. I am still wondering how mine was damaged.

The good news is that it's easy to replace if it is.
The pilot bearing is easy to install. However, removing the OE one was one of the hardest thing I've done - two broken pullers and one modified one before I got it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I doubt it, unless yours was already bent somehow. It would take a lot of force to bend it. At worst you probably trashed your pilot bearing. I am still wondering how mine was damaged.

The good news is that it's easy to replace if it is.
Relatively easy haha. I don't have a lift or a usable garage right now and the weather sucks here right now. I'm gonna try next week.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The pilot bearing is easy to install. However, removing the OE one was one of the hardest thing I've done - two broken pullers and one modified one before I got it out.
My original one was pretty hard to get out too. Most pullers don't fit this bearing, so I kept having to return them. I even tried the bread method, which I later found out is bad because these engines have a freeze plug at the crank shaft that can be damaged, then leak oil... Luckily it didn't seem damaged. To get it out, I rented a bearing puller with a slide hammer. To get the puller to fit, I had to remove one of the arms and put it back together inside the bearing. It took probably 10 pulls to get it to come out. I'm hoping the new one comes out easily too now...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Get a blind hole puller set from harbor frieght.
I think they're about $80 and I'm done spending money haha. I added up all my receipts and I'm just over $1000 for this install. I had to buy some big jacks/ jack stands though. I also replaced the driveshaft carrier bearing, pinion seal, output shaft seal, and rear main seal. All the little stuff adds up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Here's a video I recorded of the sound if you guys want to check it out. The sound only happens when I push the clutch pedal in or start letting off.
 

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Hey all,
This is my first post on here, but I've been searching for info on here about how to install an LS7 clutch in my 06 GTO like crazy. Not gonna lie, it was hard to find info about how to actually do it even though it seems to be popular. Also, it seems that the knowledge base articles are gone. From what I understood, I needed to keep the GTO pilot bearing and the GTO slave cylinder, and use the LS2/LS7 Corvette flywheel with the pressure plate and clutch disc. That's exactly what I installed. Please someone let me know if any of that sounds off. The install went pretty smoothly, until trying to get the last inch of the transmission to install on the bell housing. We got stuck there and it would not go in, even after greasing the input shaft a good amount and also making sure it was lined up with studs sticking out of the bell housing. It seemed like it was getting stuck on the pilot bearing since it was only the last inch. I know this part isn't recommended, but we decided to slowly and evenly both the transmission back in to get that last inch to go. It seemed to go in easily at that point. After getting everything installed, I now have a noise only when I push the clutch pedal in when the car is on, but not when it's off. It sounds like somethings rubbing. Do you guys have any ideas? Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Alex
If you kept the existing slave, then the throw out bearing is bad. It only touches the spring fingers on the pressure plate when you push the pedal. When you replace the clutch you should always replace the slave and throw out bearing
 

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If you kept the existing slave, then the throw out bearing is bad. It only touches the spring fingers on the pressure plate when you push the pedal. When you replace the clutch you should always replace the slave and throw out bearing
i think it is actually in constant contact with the plate fingers.

there might be an air gap at rpm, but i think at rest or at idle they might be touching when the clutch is engaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you kept the existing slave, then the throw out bearing is bad. It only touches the spring fingers on the pressure plate when you push the pedal. When you replace the clutch you should always replace the slave and throw out bearing
I replaced it with a new one (y)
 

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Where did you find an output shaft seal? I thought they had to be milled down to fit, well the auto seals did anyway...?
 

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Where did you find an output shaft seal? I thought they had to be milled down to fit, well the auto seals did anyway...?
I didn't have to do anything to it, just pounded it in carefully. I bought it on rockauto.com. It's an ACDelco 12530278
 

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Heating up the area where the pilot bearing is pressed into expands hole making it easier to press (and pull) the pilot bearing in straight. Heat is almost always the difference between easy and breaking shit. And I’m not talking red hot, hotter than the bearing itself will make a big difference to your puller and the bearing when you’re hammering it in.

Since I typed this up before I realized the direction the conversation is going in... The purpose of the alignment tool is to align the clutch disk with the pilot bearing. There isn’t much play In the spline fit, if the trans can be plugged in and fully seated, the clutch is properly aligned.
 
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