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Sea-Doo RXP 215 HP!!!
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Has anyone had any problems with their subwoofers after adjusting the gain on the factory amp? I have done it but not quite sure if it is entirely safe for the speakers.
 
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Very Quick Silver said:
Has anyone had any problems with their subwoofers after adjusting the gain on the factory amp? I have done it but not quite sure if it is entirely safe for the speakers.
here's the deal with gain controls on any amp. if they are set too high, then at high volume the signal will start clipping (you will hear this as sound starting to cut out or some really nasty distortion) or in extreme cases or after a prolonged period the sub could eventually blow.

now, on the stock amp, i really doubt that the gain is set very precisely at the factory, if at all, and by my reasoning the gain SHOULD be adjusted to get the best (or sometimes just loudest) sound out of your subs without damaging them. keep in mind that in some cases the gain may be set too high from the factory and you may actually have to turn it down, but they are probably set somewhat conservatively from the factory and you might be able to turn them up a little

with that being said, here is the proper way to adjust the gains on your amp:

with the car parked (of course) and the key set to the ACC position (engine not running--if it's on it will be harder for you to hear distortion that could be damaging your subs!!), turn your stereo on, then turn the gain all the way down to zero. it is a good idea to put on a cd with pretty consistent bass notes and just put it on repeat

next, turn the volume up (on the stereo, not the gain control on the amp) to the max, or as high as you could ever possibly imagine yourself turning it up

then, slooooooooooooooowly start turning up the gain on your amp. you will hear the subs starting to come to life

keep turning up the gains in small increments and listening to the music. continue turning up the gains until the subs get as loud as you could possibly ever want them, or until they start distorting or clipping (or if you're more conservative, until they "sound good to you" or until they match the interior speakers at a good level). at this point, back the gains down just a tiny bit (mostly just a precaution, you could thereoretically run them at their max all the time, but i don't like to take any chances).

now your gains are set to let the subs play as loud as they can while minimizing the risk of damage to them
 
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