LS1GTO Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've had a squeaking coming from the Procharger belt tensioner for a week or two. ATI wanted $89 for a replacement pulley, so I decided to just replace the bearings myself.

This is a simple project that can be done in an hour at home, with common hand tools.

Tools Required:
9/16" wrench
3/4" wrench
ratchet with 3/4" socket
Snap Ring Pliers
6" C-Clamp

Parts required:
2 ea Fafnir 203vv bearings or equivalent
I used MasterPro PT203FF, available at O'Reilley Auto Parts for $5.99 ea. The Fafnir bearings can be purchased online from Motion Industries for $11.99 ea, but I didn't know the part numbers until I took it apart and the MasterPro's were available locally.

First step is to remove the tensioner assembly from the Procharger main bracket and place it on a suitable work surface. I used an old 2" x 12" bench I had sitting in the garage.



Next, you need to remove the bolt holding the pulley to the tensioner arm. Now you can remove the bolt and steel bushing from the pulley.



With the bolt out of the way, you can remove the snap ring securing the bearings in the pulley.



To press the bearings out I used a c-clamp and the steel bushing.
You will need to put something under the edges of the pulley in order to press the bearings all the way out, I used a couple of 3/8" allen wrenches (not pictured). Don't be alarmed when you hear the bearing "popping" while pressing it out, this is normal on a press fit.



Once the bearings are out, clean the inside of the pulley well and you are ready for reassembly.

Once again I used a c-clamp to press the bearings in. Use care to only apply pressure to the outer race, I found a socket that would fit inside the pulley bore easily and still contact the outer race of the bearing solidly.



Make sure the bearing is going in squarely while pressing it in. On a side note, these are radial bearings, so it doesn't matter which direction you install them in.

Press the first bearing in until it bottoms out, then repeat for the second bearing. Install the snap ring and steel bushing, then bolt it back to the tensioner arm using blue loctite.

Your tensioner assembly is ready to be placed back on the main bracket, and you saved $70.

Edit: I also noticed the limiting speed on these bearings with grease lubrication is 9,470 rpm. Running the 7" crank pulley and the 3" tensioner pulley means the idler turns roughly 2.3 times faster than the crank. If you are spinning the motor to 6,500 rpm, then the idler is running approx. 15,000 rpm, quite a bit over its rated limit.

I'll be researching some options for bearing upgrades next week when SKF Tech is open.
 

·
GM Tech
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I have a noise too. I does it above idle and not all the time. If you push down on the tensioner arm and it goes away. Did yours do the same thing or is this something completely different? Also, does yours have the spacer behind the head unit pulley?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Procharger belt noise:
Hey guys I had a squeal comming from my P1SC tensioner pulley.
The pulley was becomming glazed possibly indicating a tracking problem.
Called Bob @ EPP and he mentioned they were not installing the spacer included in the GTO kit.
This is a fairly slim thing that goes behind the head unit pulley. Removed mine and the
noise went away. 2 months now and it has not returned. Thanks Bob !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have a noise too. I does it above idle and not all the time. If you push down on the tensioner arm and it goes away. Did yours do the same thing or is this something completely different? Also, does yours have the spacer behind the head unit pulley?
I'm not running the spacer on mine I removed it quite a while ago to get the belt alignment right.

The symptoms you describe sound like the issue I was having. The squealing wasn't continuos and was highly RPM dependent.

I also noticed the limiting speed on these bearings with grease lubrication is 9,470 rpm. Running the 7" crank pulley and the 3" tensioner pulley means the idler turns roughly 2.3 times faster than the crank. If you are spinning the motor to 6,500 rpm, then the idler is running approx. 15,000 rpm, quite a bit over its rated limit.

I'll be researching some options for bearing upgrades next week when SKF Tech is open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Ive been looking for bearings that are actually rated for the correct speed for a few weeks that arent crap.

You can find them here if anyone is intersted.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320417370541
Dude, I know you're just trying to make a buck, but that's quite a mark-up you put on those bearings.

If anyone is interested in a good upgrade, the SKF part number is 6203 2RSJEM (C3), $11.29 ea purchased from Motion Industries online. These are a sealed bearing, rated @ 17,000 rpm with grease lubrication, which is plenty for a 7k rpm motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I've had a squeaking coming from the Procharger belt tensioner for a week or two. ATI wanted $89 for a replacement pulley, so I decided to just replace the bearings myself.

This is a simple project that can be done in an hour at home, with common hand tools.

Tools Required:
9/16" wrench
3/4" wrench
ratchet with 3/4" socket
Snap Ring Pliers
6" C-Clamp

Parts required:
2 ea Fafnir 203vv bearings or equivalent
I used MasterPro PT203FF, available at O'Reilley Auto Parts for $5.99 ea. The Fafnir bearings can be purchased online from Motion Industries for $11.99 ea, but I didn't know the part numbers until I took it apart and the MasterPro's were available locally.

First step is to remove the tensioner assembly from the Procharger main bracket and place it on a suitable work surface. I used an old 2" x 12" bench I had sitting in the garage.



Next, you need to remove the bolt holding the pulley to the tensioner arm. Now you can remove the bolt and steel bushing from the pulley.



With the bolt out of the way, you can remove the snap ring securing the bearings in the pulley.



To press the bearings out I used a c-clamp and the steel bushing.
You will need to put something under the edges of the pulley in order to press the bearings all the way out, I used a couple of 3/8" allen wrenches (not pictured). Don't be alarmed when you hear the bearing "popping" while pressing it out, this is normal on a press fit.



Once the bearings are out, clean the inside of the pulley well and you are ready for reassembly.

Once again I used a c-clamp to press the bearings in. Use care to only apply pressure to the outer race, I found a socket that would fit inside the pulley bore easily and still contact the outer race of the bearing solidly.



Make sure the bearing is going in squarely while pressing it in. On a side note, these are radial bearings, so it doesn't matter which direction you install them in.

Press the first bearing in until it bottoms out, then repeat for the second bearing. Install the snap ring and steel bushing, then bolt it back to the tensioner arm using blue loctite.

Your tensioner assembly is ready to be placed back on the main bracket, and you saved $70.

Edit: I also noticed the limiting speed on these bearings with grease lubrication is 9,470 rpm. Running the 7" crank pulley and the 3" tensioner pulley means the idler turns roughly 2.3 times faster than the crank. If you are spinning the motor to 6,500 rpm, then the idler is running approx. 15,000 rpm, quite a bit over its rated limit.

I'll be researching some options for bearing upgrades next week when SKF Tech is open.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top