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Just to add to this good write up. A few notes from my experience

No need to remove the axle from the diff, I just tied mine up to the top of the coil spring out of the way.

I had the special tool. WHich I think on cars driven in the rustbelt, is probably required, I don't think I'd have gotten that bearing out of the control arm without the tool. It took the tool, with a 3/4 drive ratchet, with a 4' 1.25"dia pipe on that, plus heat with a torch, to get my bearing to even budge.

Some had questions on how to use the tool. Remove the 4 parking brake bolts from the brake face (two torx on top, two 15mm on bottom), run the bolts in and out from the back side many times to clean up the threads. Your tool has 4 standoffs that screw into the back of the plate in those park brake thread holes. . two long, 1 short and 1 med. The two long ones go in the rear most holes, and you can see where the med and short ones go then. Bolt your handled steel plate to those standoffs, bolt the triganle threaded rod to the steel plate, and use the supplied bearing pusher steel (looks like a washer) to run that bearing out. To put the bearing in, use the supplied bearing puller screwed into the end of that giant threaded rod along with the supplied thrust bearing, and pull your bearing back in. It does help alot if you throw your bearing into the freezer for a couple hrs. Mine ran right in super easy doing that with the tool.

The tool can be used on the car at least to get the old bearing out, put the new bearing in. YOu cannot use the tool on the car to press the stub back in, that is the reason the book procedure wants the control arm off so you can properly support the inner bearing as that stub is going in. But the heat bearing and freeze stub seems to work pretty good, I did that, then just taped the stub in with a rubber mallet and enough threads were on the back of it so I started using the stub nut to keep pulling the stub all the way in, run the nut down, remove, stack some washers on it, run the nut down, repeat....etc. Of course you need the proper size washers, which I had. Don't just beat the stub all the way in without support to the back side of the bearing or you'll just wreck your new bearing.


To get the old bearing race off the stub, this type of puller is the best type for that.


I had a full OTC bearing puller set with various sizes and types of pullers. Helps to have the right tools, pulls right off with this.


Also, this cheap advance auto socket fits that nut without having to grind it down. And they all seem to stock this nut in the stores as well. It's so cheap, it's already super thin walled!


It's definitely not a job for the faint of heart. There's quite a bit involved and it takes quite a bit of time and some weird tools help alot, but it can be done without too much issue.
 

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Powdercoat all of it
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Man, so glad y'all posted this! I'll be attacking this on the passenger side, where a previous owner broke a stud. I already have the new bearing and hub awaiting install, I just want to get my Brembos ready to do it all at once. Again, thanks for posting, everyone!

Maybe I missed it, does anyone have a list of relevant torque specs for the fasteners going back in? Axle 8mm allen bolts, the 32mm nut, etc?
 

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Why couldn't you carefully cut the stub bearing race off with a cut off wheel? I know you would have to be careful not to cut the stub but if you cut about 7/8 of the way through the race then chisel it the rest of the way off. Why is there a separate bearing and race anyway? The new bearings look like a one piece deal. Is this a new design from the old bearing? How would you replace this new design bearing if it doesn't come apart like the old design? You couldn't get the stub off.
 

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Why couldn't you carefully cut the stub bearing race off with a cut off wheel? I know you would have to be careful not to cut the stub but if you cut about 7/8 of the way through the race then chisel it the rest of the way off. Why is there a separate bearing and race anyway? The new bearings look like a one piece deal. Is this a new design from the old bearing? How would you replace this new design bearing if it doesn't come apart like the old design? You couldn't get the stub off.
it's easier removing the race with the bearing splitter, and the new bearings are the same design, they just come assembled.
 
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