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Discussion Starter #1
I wish I had a second set of eyes to double, triple, quadruple check my work here. Maybe you guys can lend an opinion.

I chagned out my stock plugs with tr55's. Chagned out the stock wires with Taylor Thundervolts.

The stock plugs were gapped at .040. After reading numerous threads here, I figured I'd gap the new plugs at .040 as well. I triple checked the gap before I put them back in.

Added appropriate amounts of dialectric grease to the plugs. Tightened the plugs down snug.

Everything went back in fine. Started the car up, it stumbled a tiny bit on startup, and had what I'm guessing were a couple of misfires till it "warmed" up (literally 30 seconds), then the idle smoothed out and everything was normal.

I drove it yesterday afternoon without issue. After it sat for a couple hours it did the same thing till it was "warm".

Today, I went back and checked the plugs to make sure they didnt come loose after a coulpe of heat cycles, added a bit more grease to the plug connectors, reseated all plug wire connections.

It was dead cold, and did the same thing on startup...I guess you could call it a hard start, as it didnt fire immediately. It stumbled a bit till it got warm and the symptom went away when it was warm.

Any ideas? Gap too small for the tr55s? Bad plug? Bad wire? I'm out of ideas.
 

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Clowface 2016
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You might want to try a bigger gap. I think when I put my plugs in I gapped them at .050 or .055 and have never had a problem with them.
 

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TR55's have a tighter gap than the TR5's, I believe. I have TR5 and gap them at .050. Hasn't been a problem in over 15K miles.
 

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Let's roll...
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TR5's come pre-gapped at .035 while the TR55's come in at .050.

Here's what I would do. Make sure that the conductor on the inside of the boot is actually connected to the coil correctly. I have the Thundervolts and that little conductor inside the boot is at a slight angle, which in turn makes it entirely possible that the conductor is pushed to the side inside the boot rather than over. You should hear a little snap when it goes over.
 

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skip the dialectric greese. it's not needed and could be causing some conact loss when cold. the greese will actually slow down the conduction rate of your ignition system. It works for sustained electical distribution but is not practical for spark type use where electric current is sent in impulses.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, now this has got me pulling my hair out.

The car has thrown a CEL, and still idles like $hit. I regapped to .050, went back to the original plug wires, it still idled funny, has no power and has also thrown a CEL.

the only otehr thing I can do is go back to the orignal plugs and wires, but I have a feeling it would still be off....

I'm about to give up.
 

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What A Rush..
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You might have a bad plug or two or a tiny crack in the porcelain. I had a similar issue with a previous car. Try running with the old plugs back in a see if she smooths out or is still stumbling.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great minds think alike!

I went back to the stock plugs and wires, reset the ecu to get rid of the CEL, car ran fine.

Took out the stock plug wires and put the Taylors back on. Ran fine.

So, I've got 8 plugs one or more of which is bad and was causing the problem. I guess now I can try to track down the bad plug. I guess I could swap them into one of the easier to get to cylinders one at a time till I find the culprit.

What a pain in the azz.
 

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What A Rush..
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Treadhead said:
Great minds think alike!

I went back to the stock plugs and wires, reset the ecu to get rid of the CEL, car ran fine.

Took out the stock plug wires and put the Taylors back on. Ran fine.

So, I've got 8 plugs one or more of which is bad and was causing the problem. I guess now I can try to track down the bad plug. I guess I could swap them into one of the easier to get to cylinders one at a time till I find the culprit.

What a pain in the azz.
Be thankful it isn't in a Vette like mine was, those back plugs are a bitCCH. A careful inspection should be done with plugs before an install I have seen quite a few that were cracked. Autolight, AC's didn't matter. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
BLK2005GTO said:
Why did you change plugs and wires???????? To many mods to list or what? You wont gain anything by doing this, except your grief. Try putting the stockers back in, and leave it alone!!!!!!!!
Why? To make it run a little smoother, to make it go a little bit faster, to get that last little bit of gas mileage, to make the car run better as a whole. Little things add up. Every little bit counts.

For instance, the car DOES idle better, stock wires vs. Taylors; I know, I just did a back to back comparison. The same can most likely be said of the stock plugs.

Good for me, the "grief" is gone, thanks to all who chimed in.

P.S. I'm glad I'm not working on a Vette!
 

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An old trick...

A shot of silicon spray inside the plug wire boot and on the plug threads before install.

Helps keep them from seizing after prolonged periods and improves conductivity/contact.

I wouldn't drip a bunch in the cylinder but a drop or two won't hurt nothing.

Don't hurt to wipe those plug wires down with silicone spray either. Keeps 'em young and soft.

Also, if you have the screw-cap plugs, make sure those caps are clean and tight. Dirt/oil/residue can also creep under those caps and reduce conductivity.
 
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