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I am anxiously awaiting my Blue GTO.
Living in Michigan most of my life, we used to get new cars
rustproofed. Ziebart, Tuffy, were a couple of vendors that
come to mind. This fell out of favor when US manufacturers
began to use galvanized sheet metal and pay attention to
corrosion issues. I haven't had a car rust for years.

One of the areas that I understood needed attention to
transition the Monaro to GTO was in corrosion resistance.
Do we think they prepared it for our salt laden winter streets
in Northern states?

Has anyone given any thought to taking some additional steps
to ensure the long life of our sheet metal?


Hopefully in December!!!
Carguy
 

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IIRC, they are dipped in a tank of primer in the paint shop.

However, that said I had my Holden treated prior to delivery (1996) and it is still free of any blemishes.

Mike
 

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I work for GM and I remember reading that part of converting this car over was rust proofing 200 to 300 different areas. I am sure that it still won't be as good as it is here in the states ---- our cars go through the elpo tank every metal part and are electricly charged so that the undercoat goes to all areas and corners. Cars that we build that are going over seas are taken to a spray booth and certain areas are coated to protect against the salt air during shipping.
 

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Hi guys I used to live in SLC Utah and i know what corrosion problems you can get over there. I have owned many Aussie cars and they dont have sufficient rust prevention for your situation. Get them rustproofed and extend their life.;)
 

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Maybe, mebbe not

All Holdens are full-emersion dipped for rustproofing. Older (pre-90) Holdens weren't, but I struggle to recall seeing any big-body Commodores which were introd'd in '88 with any rust, surface or structural.

While we don't have salted roads (very little snow except in alpine regions) about 80-90% of Australia's population lives less than 50 miles from an ocean. Seaside real-estate is the big seller, and yet rusty Holdens less than fifteen years old just aren't seen. Same thing goes for the country - especially the outback where the soil is very alkaline. So for a daily driver in winter, maybe. For a 'garage queen' probably not. But it won't hurt.
 

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Thanks MARK II I was'nt sure how they were done down there. I have been with GM for 28yrs but till this GTO has come out I have'nt known much about our sister plants.
 

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MarkII,

Are you saying that they are dipped during a galvanic process or the car is dipped in a primer or rustproofing process?

Wasn't clear on what you meant?
 

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Here is what is straight off Holden's Monaro page:

'Full immersion body corrosion protection'.

I have searched for info on what that means. I remember reading a long time ago when they put the plant in, that it was electrostatic paint, but I can't swear to this. It may be galvanic, but that is doubtful.
 

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Most, probably all, cars in the US are coated by a primer process called electrodeposition. The bare body is submersed in a tank of electrically charged epoxy paint that is drawn to the grounded body. The real advantage of this is 'draw power', the ability to coat areas that are recessed or inside.
To enlighten even more most corrosion resistance comes from the treatment before that which is a surface conversion sometimes called phosphating. It can be spray or dip or both. Plain steel lasts easily ten to twenty years or more if the coating stays substantially intact. Areas that the coating chips off are sometimes made of galvanized steel to slow corrosion after the coating is chipped off by stones, salt, etc..
OK, probably more than you wanted to know but I suspect Australia follows similiar procedures. I would guess the changes may have had more to do with US FMVSS - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards or whatever they are called now that cross over corrosion protection for seat belt attachments, windshield adhesive, brakes, ...... just a guess!!!
 
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